Boardroom Briefing – The State of the US Economy and Global Implications (Syd)

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Date/Time

Date(s) - 13/05/10
8:30am - 10:00am

Location

Park Hyatt Sydney
7 Hickson Street, The Rocks


About the Speaker

Martin Stuart (Marty) Feldstein is a conservative American economist.

He is currently the George F. Baker Professor of Economics at Harvard University, and the president emeritus of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). He served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the NBER from 1978 through 2008. From 1982 to 1984, Feldstein served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers and as chief economic advisor to President Ronald Reagan (where his deficit hawk views clashed with Reagan administration economic policies). He has also been a member of the Washington-based financial advisory body the Group of Thirty since 2003. He is among the 10 most influential economists in the world according to IDEAS/RePEc. He is the author of more than 300 research articles in economics and is known primarily for his work on macroeconomics and public finance. He has pioneered much of the research on the working mechanism and sustainability of public pension systems.

In 1997, writing about the upcoming European monetary union and the euro, Feldstein warned that the “adverse economic effects of a single currency.” “In 2005, Feldstein was widely considered a leading candidate to succeed chairman Alan Greenspan as Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. … Ultimately, the position went to [Ben] Bernanke, possibly because Feldstein was a board member of AIG … he had served as a Director of AIG since 1988.” “On February 6, 2009, Feldstein was announced as one of U.S. President Obama’s advisors on the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board.”

“A well-known figure on the Harvard campus, Feldstein taught the introductory economics class “Social Analysis 10: Principles of Economics” (commonly referred to as “Ec 10” by Harvard students) for twenty years …. Ec 10 was routinely the largest class at Harvard.”

Source – Wikipedia